4 Tips for Developing a Social Media Engagement Process

Full post available on Ethos-Marketing.

Managing your social media channels goes beyond just publishing content to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or other channels consistently. In addition to publishing fresh, quality content, driving engagement is crucial to your social strategy. Driving likes, comments, or shares from followers is an obvious win, but engaging with these followers directly is the real opportunity.

In order to engage with your fans consistently (and appropriately!), all comments and messages made on social media – negative, positive, or neutral – should have a written protocol for responsive engagement. This protocol should be aligned with overall organizational practices and tone.

 

Read More

5 Reasons Why Your Brand Should Be Creating Facebook LIVE Video Content

Full post available on Ethos-Marketing

Facebook LIVE video is hard to ignore. This interactive, broadcast-style video format, also called live-streaming, has exploded in popularity recently, and it’s not hard to see why. It’s incredibly easy to “go live” from anywhere as it doesn’t require fancy equipment aside from a mobile device or laptop. Facebook LIVE videos also invite the audience to participate, making them extremely valuable for businesses or organizations looking to connect with their audiences on a more personal level.

Facebook Live

Here at Ethos, we’re big fans of Facebook LIVE and use it for many of our clients. From conversations around affording college, to skincare treatments, and even public health, we’ve helped clients embrace this medium to communicate and engage with their online audiences. While some clients were hesitant at first – primarily due to the un-edited, un-scripted, anything-could-happen nature of the platform – the majority have come around and learned to embrace live video and the engagement it brings.

Read More

Social Marketing vs. Social Media: What’s the Difference and Why It Matters

Full post available on Ethos-Marketing

The terms “social media” and “social marketing” are often used interchangeably, and while it’s easy to see how it happens, it’s important to understand that these two terms mean very different things. Certainly, social media and social marketing can work together, but grasping their differences will save you from having egg on your face in any marketing discussion.

Social (Media) Marketing

The Differences Between Social Media and Social Marketing

Social media, by its simplest definition, is a communications platform. The most popular are Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. It’s where you converse and network with friends, family, and others. It’s a common tactic used by marketers – and can also be used to help execute social marketing campaigns. But in and of itself, social media is simply a tool – one that requires a strategy behind it to be used effectively. That’s where social marketing comes in.

Read More

Social Media for Healthcare: Your HIPAA Compliance Checklist

Full post available on Ethos-Marketing

Managing social media in the healthcare industry can feel like swimming with sharks in treacherous waters. Why? Compliance with HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is complicated and intense, especially when it comes to social media since interpretation can often land you in muddy waters.  No wonder only 26% of hospitals and 36% of physician practices in the U.S. are active on social media.

HIPAA Social Media

But the knee-jerk reaction to skip out on social media completely comes at a cost for healthcare organizations. For example, 80% of patients that are active on social media are using it to research doctors and hospitals while reading up on medical news and information, making social media a prime opportunity to get your organization and providers in front of potential patients.

Read More

The Layman’s Guide to GDPR

Full post available on Ethos-Marketing

You may have noticed your inbox was overflowing with privacy policy updates last week. We’re guessing you didn’t take the time to read each and everyone because, well, that’s a lot of fine print. But there IS a reason for the influx. Last week the deadline for GDPR compliance hit. GDPR, which stands for General Data Protection Regulation, has been on a planned rollout in the European Union (EU) since May 2016. The regulation now gives individuals power over the use of their personal data and holds organizations accountable for their data collection and usage practices.

GDPR

Wondering why you should care about regulation in the EU? The GDPR applies to any organization that does business with EU residents. So basically, if you do business online, it could very well apply to you. If you’re a US business but you’re knowingly conducting business in the EU, GDPR can and will be directly enforced by EU members/state authorities. Your business may even be required to designate an EU representative. If you’re a small business that’s not actively or knowingly doing business in the EU, rules get a bit murky. If the collection of personal data is deemed to be occasional and doesn’t risk the rights and freedoms, the inadvertent collect of personal data may be forgivable, leaving your company at the mercy of the country impacted.

Read More

3 Ways to Stay Social Media Safe Without Having to #DeleteFacebook

Full post available on Ethos-Marketing

For most users, Facebook is just a casual place to share photos, converse with friends, and play hours of Candy Crush – I am guilty of all of these things on a personal level. So I get it why people are up in arms about the Cambridge Analytica data scandal. But I’m not ready to #DeleteFacebook quite yet.

Delete FB

For one, it makes me just a little bit suspicious that many of the people fueling the fire around the #DeleteFacebook campaign have some potentially ulterior motives. WhatsApp co-founder Brian Acton is one of the most notable. He sold WhatsApp to Facebook in 2014 for a cool 16 billion, then promptly left the company and started a new venture meant to directly compete with WhatsApp. The downfall of Facebook would represent a huge opportunity for his new company. So maybe he’s ready to delete Facebook because he’s worried about data – or maybe he just wants you to make space on your phone for his new venture.

Read More